the life with playstation [email protected] project concludes

Sunday, November 4th, 2012, was the last morning when [email protected] on Life With Playstation received my Playstation 3’s last completed work unit. One of the selling points for my reason of getting a PS3 was the capability of donating more CPU power to the distributed computing project.

I took these last screenshots to preserve the memory of the application on my Playstation. I continue to contribute to the project on a regular basis by donating the CPU power of Diode, my trusty file server that has been folding proteins since I built it back in 2007, and occasionally from c0rey foldman, my desktop computer with a Phenom quad-core processor.

I have built and used many desktop computers that have contributed to Stanford University’s [email protected] project. I started donating around 2001-2002 with an Athlon Thunderbird 1.4  processor that I still have stored away somewhere but has been retired for years. I have used a couple Athlon XP’s and a few Athlon 64 X2’s (including the one in Diode that still folds on), and an Phenom X4 that I burn up maybe a couple months a year these days when the temperature drops considerably.

I was excited to gain a Playstation 3 back in 2008, because that fulfilled my dream of having the machine that folded using the Cell, the multi-core processor used in the PS3. I managed to donate 1533+ work units over the years with my Playstation. The images provided here are a little deceiving. I had a system crash that required me to reinstall Life With Playstation and lose the completed count from the first round. I can only recall that I was in the triple digits before that unfortunate incident.

When I fired on the Playstation today, I wanted to see if any changes were made to Life With Playstation since I last checked on Sunday. I read the news around the end of October that the program was ending, so I was not surprised. I was waiting for the actual end date which had to have occurred some time this week if not today. I started the LWP application, and it required an immediate update. After the 11MB file downloaded and installed, running the program again displayed this message:

Folding proteins on my Cell microprocessor has finally ended. Technology is always evolving, and this milestone marks the end of a five-year relationship that I was proud to participate in.

^_^

On a numerological note: 1533 is the same sequence of numbers in 1.533GHz, the stable overclocked speed of the first processor I used for [email protected], my Athlon Thunderbird.

the everlasting nap

A leftover chicken tender seasoned with salt, pepper, and garlic powder was cut it up and placed in a bowl with water and rice noodles. The bowl was microwaved for two and a half minutes, then the oil and flavoring included in the pho gà package was added. The contents of the bowl were quickly mixed around and microwaved for another minute and a half.

After the soup was given time to cool off to a pleasant temperature, it was consumed. Within half an hour, I was asleep in my bed intending to only take a nap for half an hour. I woke up to the sound of M walking through the door at one in the morning. I was supposed to pick her up from the airport but failed to turn on the ringer on my phone and slept through. Oops and argh.

the sadwich

Before I go to bed for the night during the workweek, I prepare my lunch for the next day. Two pieces of bread go into the toaster. After they finish toasting, I let them sit and cool off to room temperature. Then I add a slice of cheese (currently jalapeño jack) and four slices of smoked turkey to construct my simple every workday sandwich.

Tonight, I was down to a single slice of turkey, the last slice of cheese, and the last pair of bread slices not including the ends. Instead of the standard four slices, tomorrow’s sandwich will only have a single slice of lunchmeat partnered up with the last slices of bread and cheese one last time before I have to make a small trip to the grocery store.

Maybe I should just go with a peanut butter sandwich but the texture isn’t pleasant after refrigeration. Maybe I should treat myself to Taco Bell but the current parking situation prevents me from leaving the office to visit a drive-thru. I am settling with my single slice of meat with a single slice of cheese cozied up between a couple slices of honey wheat toast. I will satisfy my hunger tomorrow with my hopefully first and last sadwich for lunch. Peace out.

the tv lift cabinets

A high-definition television is a mainstay in most homes. We depend on this device to provide us with news and entertainment. After a hard day of work, relaxing on the couch in front of the TV helps many people unwind. On the weekends, watching sports or a good movie is commonplace across the country.

Televisions are not easy to view when sitting on the carpet or hardwood floor. They need a sturdy piece of furniture or some sort of way to position them near eye level or above for everyone to enjoy. With lift furniture for televisions, watching your favorite show will be enjoyed to its fullest potential. These cabinets have space to store Blu-ray™ discs, game consoles, or anything else like extra coffee table books or family photo albums that are not usually sitting out.

TV lift cabinets are available in many sizes and designs to fit anyone’s home and television setup. Traditional cabinets made of wood are made to last a lifetime. Modern cabinets are equally as strong but have the sleek design that some people may prefer over the classic selections. For anyone looking to upgrade where they set their flatscreen television, browsing online to discover a cabinet fit for the décor is the best first step in the search for that perfect addition to a living room or bedroom.

the treble frequencies of whispering

I don’t post much about my workplace, but an annoyance has inspired me to jot this down.

I work in a quiet environment. One of my tasks require me to do a large amount of reading. I have the comfort of wearing stereo ear buds and listening to morning talk radio followed by podcasts until the end of my work day. I am left in solitude with my ears filled with enough jabber to keep me mostly away from my thoughts and other unnecessary distractions while I scan through texts and punch keys.

I work near others who have their own desks and do their fair share of reading to accomplish the tasks at hand. One of my co-workers nearby does the extremely annoying act of whispering to himself while he reads. Despite my ears being filled with other sounds at a respectable volume, the hiss created by his whispers penetrates my skull worse than television static. Even when I turn the volume up, the frequencies he emits still overpower the sound that cannot drown the high-pitched S’s that dart through the air like lasers into my consciousness.

I’ve never really liked whispering. I prefer speaking in a voice at the lowest possible volume when necessary. Whispering drills a hole through my brain that I do my best to avoid it. What is with people that need to whisper when they read? The place can be so quiet that the hum of desktop computer fans can be heard, so whispers easily break the near silence that disrupt my thought processes. All I can do is tolerate it to preserve my own peace or as much of it as I can maintain.

the forgetful sandwich

As I have gotten older, I have become more dependent on jotting down to-do lists more so than keeping track of them in my head. Although the weeks stay somewhat consistent revolving around a full-time job and getting a good night’s rest, the tasks outside the routine of running errands, doing chores, and keeping each day stabilized requires me to write down anything I may forget.

Little things like what few things I need from the grocery store, a movie I should check out, and/or something I want to look up online is listed off in ink on a tangible notepad. I keep a few lying around, and in the recurrence where I forget to keep one in my car or leave it at home, the notes may find themselves on a stray receipt or scribbled in the palm of my hand.

I often wash my hands after exposing them to the grime of the outside world and accidentally dilute the one- or two-word memos that I might have written in my palm to my disappointment and send them into the void after an bothersome session of deciphering my esoteric cipher. After a mental sigh, I realize it’s just an essential factor that makes me human.