the sadwich

Before I go to bed for the night during the workweek, I prepare my lunch for the next day. Two pieces of bread go into the toaster. After they finish toasting, I let them sit and cool off to room temperature. Then I add a slice of cheese (currently jalapeño jack) and four slices of smoked turkey to construct my simple every workday sandwich.

Tonight, I was down to a single slice of turkey, the last slice of cheese, and the last pair of bread slices not including the ends. Instead of the standard four slices, tomorrow’s sandwich will only have a single slice of lunchmeat partnered up with the last slices of bread and cheese one last time before I have to make a small trip to the grocery store.

Maybe I should just go with a peanut butter sandwich but the texture isn’t pleasant after refrigeration. Maybe I should treat myself to Taco Bell but the current parking situation prevents me from leaving the office to visit a drive-thru. I am settling with my single slice of meat with a single slice of cheese cozied up between a couple slices of honey wheat toast. I will satisfy my hunger tomorrow with my hopefully first and last sadwich for lunch. Peace out.

the ‘za of the week (mar 9 – mar 15)

The ‘Za of the Week post has been delayed but not forgotten lately. Mare and I made this pie last Thursday. I worked late the previous Monday and Tuesday and was able to leave an hour early. On top of the unusual, I had worked from 9 to 4 that day so I returned to the apartment much earlier than usual.

This ‘za was pretty traditional. The toppings included: sliced pepperoni, half of a sliced red onion, and pineapple tidbits.

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The pepperoni slices were lined up right next to each other, so this pizza was topped with more pepperoni than we usual put and made it that much tastier.

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The pineapple was drained with a strainer really well. The onion was sliced to make quarter-inch wide pieces.

My attack at slicing an onion goes a little like this:

  • Cut the onion in half through the ends that have that dried roots on one end and where the plant shoots out on the other end. You can lay the onion flat on the cutting board from here, and slicing will be much easier.
  • Slice the ends off and discard them.
  • Remove the first layer of the onion that should include the dry skin.
  • Slice the onion into quarter-inch thick pieces. Guide the knife with the middle joints of your fingers on the non-cutting hand. You won’t cut yourself if you keep the blade near the onion and the side of the knife as close to your bent fingers as possible.
  • Don’t throw away the middle part of the onion. Think of it as the heart, the most flavorful part of the onion. When the heart cooks up, it will provide the sweetness than red onions are known for.

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The sauce was the usual marinara we use, and we used part-skim low-moisture mozzarella. The baking sheet was greased with garlic-infused olive oil. The pie was baked at 450°F for ten minutes. It was cooled in the baking sheet for a minute then put on the cooling rack for a few more minutes. While it’s on the cooling rack, I snapped the after photos that you see here.

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Our homemade pizzas turn out better than calling up the corporates and having them bring it to your door, heating up something frozen, or even “take and bake.” Everything from the crust to the fresh ingredients to the love put into assembling these creations makes every bite worth savoring.

the ‘za of the week (feb 10 – feb 16)

Baking a pizza at home is a very relaxing experience. From stretching the dough to sprinkling the shredded cheese and adding the toppings, a homemade pizza is made with love rather than being just another pie filling a ticket in a corporate establishment.

This past Wednesday, Mare & I baked a homemade pizza topped with Canadian bacon, pineapple, and ricotta. We had fun with the arrangement of the toppings as you can see in the photograph below.

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The dough treated us well again and stretched all the way across the baking sheet. If you’re using canned pineapple to top a pie, then make sure to drain the pineapple as much as possible. We use a strainer to make sure the pineapple tidbits are well-drained. Sprinkle a decent amount of Parmesan on the marinara to soak up any extra liquid that may want to get through and sog up the crust.

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Topping a pizza is comparable to decorating a cake. Even distribution of the toppings is important, so each slice will have a balanced amount of toppings.

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This pie baked excellent. Hawaiian-style pizzas have their own unique flavor combination.

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In this close-up, you can see the shininess of the cheese caused by the grease being baked out. You can also see the baked spots on the ricotta which I really enjoy. A pineapple tidbit made the picture in the lower right corner as did a piece of Canadian bacon in the upper right corner.